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Banana Wind Maui

Carved Wood Art - White Washed Finish

Regular price $45.00 USD
Regular price Sale price $45.00 USD
Burnt Finish

How perfectly Hawaiian!  Choose your favorite island signature.  Our gifted woodworker interpreted each island’s flora or signature symbol, in Tegallalang Indonesia.  These hand carved plaques are made of Monkeypod (Suar) wood, a South Pacific Hardwood- and so forgiving with their distressed finishes in burnt or white wash.  Work with one or all designs for an outstanding display.  Each measures approximately 11.5" square. Please remember each plaque is unique- so what's pictured WILL differ slightly- some lighter, some darker- and they are all hand carved so they will vary.  If you require specifics, please call us directly and we will do our best to pick one out for you that you desire. 

Maui Lokelani: Maui recognizes the super fragrant pink Lokelani flower, or pink cottage rose, as the official island flower.  Brought to the Islands in the 1800s, the lokelani is prized by gardeners for its beauty and fragrance.

Oahu Pua Ilima: The Pua Ilima flower grows low to the ground, and blooms a sunny shade of canary yellow- most apparent near the sea, this is Oahu’s official island flower.

Kauai- Mokihana Berry:  The Mokihana Berry is the official island lei material of Kauai.  The Mokihana is a native citrus tree.  The leathery anise scented fruit must be strung within a few hours of picking.  Hawaiian women and men both wear the strung berries as leis and the scented twigs and berries were once a favorite perfume. 

Big Island- Lava:  The Big Island of Hawaii evokes thoughts of her most famous destination- the active Mount Kilauea.  This carving depicts the ebb and flow of the hot fresh lava as it creates more of the Big Island and a whole other island deep in the sea.

The State Flower of Hawaii- The Yellow Hibiscus:  The official state flower is the yellow hibiscus, also known as the pua aloalo. Hawaiians originally adopted the hibiscus flower (of all colors) as their official Territorial flower in the early 1920s. It wasn’t until 1988, however, that Hawaii’s legislature legally adopted the yellow hibiscus as the official state flower.